Different Ways to Present Identity on MySpace
THE first time I listened to Mbaqanga music, I never took it seriously and thought it can be a genre on its own to be identified as the best that could soothe and entertain someone's soul. The bumpy panoptic rhythm sound that most listeners could respond serious by nodding their heads and mimicking the words, […]

THE first time I listened to Mbaqanga music, I never took it seriously and thought it can be a genre on its own to be identified as the best that could soothe and entertain someone's soul.

The bumpy panoptic rhythm sound that most listeners could respond serious by nodding their heads and mimicking the words, was only what I thought could have caused many to lose their heads to it, not knowing that there is much into it.

The way of life, which most people around my village have been crying foul to have been lost to the western lifestyle is something I took lightly as I grew up.

With age catching up with me, I started paying attention to most of the music played around by the youngsters' that has melodious rhythm, but with the vulgar message.

At first, I thought since I am schooled, I should listen to western music, but inward my heart reminded me of Mbaqanga, which when my father played it in his car it gradually gave me a lilting spasm.

I listened to Jazz music which had permeated to my heart and especially the rhythm of the saxophone which again the Mbaqanga musicians tempered around within most of their songs.

With time as I was aging, the issue of culture started building heavily inside me and I could not ignore it any further.

This was worsened by the absence of my father who passed on for more than a decade and what I could recall more than anything else where the music that he was attuned to.

This takes me down the memory line where I could visualize seeing him with a simpering smile listening to the Mbaqanga music.

The more I listened to this type of music the more I developed acknowledgment of who I am, and how I could brand myself in the twenty-first century.

The message that I could get to the music of this type buddies me to my past, my father's way of living, and also reminding me of my Nguni language as well as the way of life.

I never thought this music can be danced around like any that I have listened to before, until the time I had to buy videos for Soul Brothers from across Limpopo.

I enjoyed their smart, stylish dance in response to Mbaqanga music. They picked it slowly but with talent and could show-off out of their bodies.

The fact that the message of most of their words are rich and filled with proverbs and idioms, as well as innuendoes that remind me of the novels I read before, is something I could not take lightly.

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